Ezekel Alan

This blog is about: cotton candy, cold milo, midgets, mangoes, sex, aged rum – everything but writing my next book

Archive for the tag “disposable man”

Some recent interviews

On Susumba: Ezekel Alan on writing, Jamaica, and Disposable People

http://www.susumba.com/books/interviews/ezekel-alan-writing-jamaica-and-disposable-people

 

On ALLI: How I Do It: Ezekel Alan. Top Tips from Top Indie Authors. – See more at: http://selfpublishingadvice.org/blog/how-i-do-it-ezekel-alan-top-tips-from-top-indie-authors/#sthash.YuZTMM1u.dpuf

http://selfpublishingadvice.org/blog/how-i-do-it-ezekel-alan-top-tips-from-top-indie-authors/

 

And recent Amazon and Goodreads comments I found interesting:

Ingrid Persaud (Amazon)

I found this a difficult but compelling read. It plunges you straight into a world of searing poverty without plot or guidance that this is a novel, memoir or art-as-writing. But stay with it and you will soon adjust and trust this unique, authentic voice as he navigates a past of haunting brutality with equally brutal honesty. And it is a generous work because although the author might have been a disposable man he has escaped – a miracle of will and education – and could have remained a safe distance. Instead he chose to return – to confront the hateful place and to tell the wretched stories of Georgie and Cookie and Tall Man and Garnet and all the others who remain either disposable or invisible to society.

Duczi (Amazon)

Readers have said this book was raw and pessimistic etc, and it is all that, but it is also incredibly funny, funny you laugh out loud. It is not for the faint hearted for sure, or for people who expect pretty characters with happy endings saying life sucks they want to read about more pleasant things in books. It is incredible to be faced with the fact how much hardship some people have to face growing up just because of the pure luck or “unluck” of having been born to a certain place, but the book does have a message that yes, it is possible to get out of there, it is possible to become a great writer and survive a childhood full of hardships. I have always liked cynical sense of humor; and I have always liked survivors.

Paul (Goodreads)

Powerful – initially hard to get into, as the style is of a memoir, but ultimately well worth persevering with. Left me hungry for more – a proper voice and a story needing to be heard.

Karen Lloyd (Goodreads)

I love how refreshingly honest this novel is. It is not an immediately-fall-in-love type of read but soon enough you come to appreciate the bluntness of the language. All in all it is a rewarding experience, traversing that ‘hateful f**king place’ with Kenny.

Katalin (Goodreads)

This book is awesome!

 

I love the simplicity of this last 5 star review.

One love

Zekes

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